LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics

EARN THE NATION'S FIRST LL.M. IN THE CUTTING-EDGE FIELD OF THE 21ST CENTURY

This is the century of the gene. Advancements in technology, from stem cell research and genetically modified organisms to DNA forensic evidence and nanotechnology, are raising a multitude of legal questions about privacy, intellectual property, regulation and liability. Today's lawyers must be prepared to handle these challenges and others surrounding international trade, evidentiary standards, personalized medicine, licensing and business planning. Because most traditional legal studies don’t offer in-depth exposure to these complex intersections of science and law, an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics was developed at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. The program is housed in the college’s Center for Law, Science & Innovation, the nation’s largest and oldest multidisciplinary research center focusing on the legal implications of new scientific discoveries and emerging technologies. 

About the Program

This is the century of the gene. Advancements in technology, from stem cell research and genetically modified organisms to DNA forensic evidence and nanotechnology, are raising a multitude of legal questions about privacy, intellectual property, regulation and liability. Today's lawyers must be prepared to handle these challenges and others surrounding international trade, evidentiary standards, personalized medicine, licensing and business planning. Because most traditional legal studies don’t offer in-depth exposure to these complex intersections of science and law, an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics was developed at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. The program is housed in the college’s Center for Law, Science & Innovation, the nation’s largest and oldest multidisciplinary research center focusing on the legal implications of new scientific discoveries and emerging technologies. 

 

Do I need an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics?
Genetics is increasingly the subject of law and legal scholarship. In the past decade, tens of thousands of published opinions and scholarly legal articles have contained the words “DNA,” “genetic” or “genomic.” Genetics is becoming an important part of many legal practice areas, including intellectual property, family, health, constitutional, employment, criminal, corporate and agricultural law. Lawyers who wish to be prepared to deal with the exponential growth in research, applications and investments in biotechnology and genomics must develop specific legal and scientific knowledge to keep pace.

Do I need a science background to participate?
No. The faculty of the Center for Law, Science & Innovation will teach you the science necessary to benefit from the program.

May I enroll as a part-time student?
Yes. The LL.M. can be completed as a one-year (two semesters) full-time program, or it may be spread over two years or more, part-time.

Why the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University?
The College of Law is an academically innovative and highly respected school with a student-teacher ratio of less than 10 to 1. The faculty has a long history of high-quality teaching, and a vast number hold post-graduate degrees in a wide array of sciences. For current information on their accomplishments, go to www.law.asu.edu/lst-faculty. Additionally, the Center for Law, Science & Innovation is the first in the nation to offer an LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics.

What does the Center for Law, Science, & Innovation do?
The Center anticipates issues raised by new knowledge, stimulates dialogue between legal and scientific experts and conducts research that promotes the legal community’s engagement with scientific and technological developments. The unique breadth of expertise within the College of Law’s faculty, 39 of whom are affiliated with the Center, supports course offerings in a broad range of law, science and technology subjects.

What if I don't have a J.D. from an American law school?
Because the legal, ethical and policy aspects of genomics and biotechnology are of global significance, the LL.M. is beneficial for non-U.S. lawyers. The College of Law will accept applications from persons holding law degrees granted by foreign law schools approved either by the governments or relevant accrediting authorities of the entities where the schools are located.

What are the admissions requirements?
Candidates must possess either a J.D. from an American Bar Association-accredited law school or a comparable law degree from a foreign law school. Admissions considerations include grades in law school and other academic programs, recommendations by professors and/or employers, employment and life experiences and evidence of interest and potential in biotechnology and genomics.

What does the program cost?
Please refer to the Tuition and Financial Aid section.

For more information about the LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics application process, please visit the admissions web page.

  

"Having an established practice in health law, I wanted to diversify, expanding my knowledge base in a complementary and emerging area. The LL.M. in Biotechnology and Genomics fit my needs perfectly, offering unlimited learning opportunities in a structured program still flexible enough to be tailored to my interests. The faculty was engaged and engaging, and my peers were a diverse and motivated group of professionals. Balancing the practice of law and school is a challenge, but it is possible; I finished all my graduation requirements within four semesters."

Sharon Lewis
LL.M. Graduate

 

What does the program cover?

Through classroom instruction and guided independent research, LL.M. candidates will learn professional skills and substantive knowledge to address new developments in genomics, as they pertain to law. Courses that may be of special interest include:
  • Bioethics and the Law
  • Biomedical Research Ethics and Law
  • Biotechnology: Law, Science & Policy
  • Biotechnology Licensing & Litigation
  • Controversies in Global Health & Ag. Biotech
  • FDA Regulation
  • Genes, Stem Cells & Justice
  • Genetics and the Law
  • Health Law
  • Intellectual Property Law
  • Nanotechnology Law and Policy
  • Neuroscience and the Law
  • Patent Litigation
  • Privacy
  • Innovation Advancement Program